Opinions, Facts, and Conclusions

Although the content of First Principles ultimately leads to politics, politics is not its focus.  Nevertheless, politics, after ideas are shaped and honed, is how things happen. As these are times where important political decisions are being made they are times where opinion and politics matter, thus this portion of our website is where politics comes to the fore.

A fundamental change in world affairs took place on September 11, 2001, when America was attacked for the first time since World War II.  As a result, political and philosophical conundrums, often on the broadest scale, are what we face.  Can we protect our citizens while defeating the enemies of free and open societies?  The answer, of course, is yes; however there are those whose means are destructive of the very system we are trying to protect.  Ultimately a balance must be struck--and reaching that balance is where political discourse becomes most valuable.

To many, as the acts of 9/11 become blurred, and our successes, because they are not total, nor final, in Afghanistan, Iraq, and other Middle Eastern nations, are questioned as to their full meaning, Americans can develop a myopic, even reactionary view of the world and our place in it. A public not physically threatened is soon forgetful. But the dangers are ever-present. No one can be sure if our security is keeping the terrorists at bay, or if the bad guys are simply biding their time in an attempt to match the effect of the September 11th attacks. No one can be sure how much success our foreign efforts are harvesting, but it is surely making a difference. Some say the only change is that angry Muslims are more determined, while others contend that if you don't confront the evil it will simply grow.

On the domestic side there are arguments to be made for stronger government, which others simply call intrusive. There are fiscal matters to be solved, security for our aging population, responsible health care options, and the continual tug between tax burdens and economic opportunity for the next generations.

In this space we intend to offer opinion pieces by those with well-considered and well formed views, on any side of any issue. Party affiliation is not important, nor is one's agenda. What is important is that what is said does two things: first, takes all positions and arguments to their fullest logical conclusions, and second, relates such positions and results to first principles.

These pieces reflect the views of each author. The Commentary page is open to anyone who wishes to submit an essay, however, determination regarding publication will be solely controlled by the editors. Articles are cross indexed by date of first publication, by author, and by title.

If you wish to submit an article please attach a short biography along with the copy, preferably in a Word document, and include a telephone number, e-mail and physical address. The phone number and addresses are for internal use only and will not be published. All submissions must be made by electronic transmission to editor.firstprinciples@gmail.com.

 
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